Project Shift Blog

Learn to Code: The Most Common Mistakes to Avoid

It’s possible to learn to code and get a job as a software engineer completely on your own - perhaps you’ve read the true stories of beginners learning to code and landing awesome jobs, but thousands more try and never succeed. Here are the most common mistakes you’re probably making and how to avoid them.
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The 4 Paths to Getting a Coding Job

Remarkably, you don’t need a degree to become a Software Engineer, nor is there only one way to break into this career. With Software Engineering, as long as you can do the job, you have a good shot at getting an offer and making a great salary. Most careers paths are the opposite. They require special certificates and years of school to earn the right to have a seat at the table. So why are things different when it comes to coding?
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4 Essential Behaviors Required to Become a Developer

Over the last several years as we’ve taught and developed new software engineers, we’ve met with dozens of software engineering leaders from across the world. From large international tech corporations in Israel, small tech startups in Austin or Durham, Google, IBM, you name it, we’ve met them and asked them the same question: “What are you looking for when you hire new software engineers?”
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What Programming Language Should I Learn?

You’ve decided you’re ready to take the plunge and start learning to code, but where do you start? There are so many resources and SO many opinions out there, it’s difficult to cut through the noise to understand what’s important in the beginning.
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Alumni Spotlight: Wes

Last week we had the chance to catch up with Project Shift Alumni and Software Engineer, Wes Jourdan. Wes works for Fugitive Labs out of The American Underground in Downtown Durham. Before entering Project Shift, Wes worked in a variety of jobs in logistics and the restaurant industry. He was dead set on teaching himself to code through online platforms before applying and being accepted to Project Shift's January 2018 fellowship.
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Adopt These 4 Essential Behaviors to Become a Software Developer

Over the last several years as we’ve taught and developed new software engineers, we’ve met with dozens of software engineering leaders from across the world. From large international tech corporations in Israel, small tech startups in Austin or Durham, Google, IBM, you name it, we’ve met them and asked them the same question:
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Why We Teach Fullstack Software Engineering

Note: This is Part 1 of a multi-part blog series which outlines the core principles of Project Shift's 12 Week Software Engineering curriculum.
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Cohort Project: Rebuilding Slack from Scratch

Project Shift students build dozens of projects throughout the course, but there’s an extra focus on the two final projects they present upon graduation at Demo Night (the last day of the cohort). One of these projects is an individual project, and the other is their “Cohort Project”.
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5 Important Ways To Evaluate Coding Schools

If you’re considering a career in coding, then you’re probably already well aware of the fact that you don’t need a Computer Science degree to do it. However, weeding through the dozens of code schools you see online is a difficult task. Unlike Computer Science degrees, these schools have very little regulation, making it hard to make a decision on which school to pursue. Therefore, you must adopt a criteria for evaluating code schools. When choosing a code school in Raleigh, NC, these are the things you should look out for:
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Cohort One: First Hackathon

Last week, our students completed their first of 3 hackathons! They began on a Wednesday afternoon where every student pitched a project idea and was then assigned groups based on the most popular ideas. Once the students settled into their groups they began sketching out wireframes and thinking through how they needed to structure their applications. All groups were required to implement React, Redux, and an API of their choice. They were given 48 hours to complete their projects before presenting to one another on Friday afternoon.
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